Teachers, Learning Opportunities Here!

January 27, 2016 by Rick Cunningham

Last season, people around the world clicked in a couple of Fire truck with ladder extendedmillion times! They were here to watch as the great horned owls brought two owlets into the world, nurtured them through cold, damp days and nights, helped them learn to fly and to hunt and eventually to leave the nest.

Installation of the Eagle CamScreen Shot 2015-02-03 at 6.31.15 PMScreen Shot 2015-02-03 at 6.31.58 PM
This year the story is unfolding This year the story is unfolding in a very similar way,but this is nature and there are no guarantees. If your class would like to participate in learning experiences centered around observations and study of these magnificent raptors, we would love to hear from you and provide expert commentary and answers to the kids’ questions.

Let us know if you would like to participate. Leave a comment to this posting, including contact information and the name and location of the school. We’ll publish a map showing where our student visitors are watching from, and will work with you on educational modules.

 

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17 Responses to “Teachers, Learning Opportunities Here!”

  1. Mrs Payne says:

    We got your postcard today. The kids were thrilled. They want to know if those were last year’s babies. They ask several times a day to see the nest. We check in usually 2 times. They can’t wait to see the owlets. We have also been watching the eagles at Berry College. They have been comparing the birds and nests. Thanks again for the card!

    • Rick Cunningham says:

      Mrs. Payne, we’re so glad to know your kids are watching and learning. Based on an analysis of their vocalizations, we think these are last year’s adults. If that’s correct, then we expect that we will see a lot of the same behaviours as last year. We spoke to the woman who compared their vocalizations a couple of days ago and next week we will post a short video of how she did her analysis. And of course we’ll all be on “hatch-watch” next week!

  2. Robin Perry says:

    I am a 4th grade Special Education teacher at Gould Elementary in Savannah, Ga. Our class has been watching the mommy GHO during any class time when we are working independently on assignments that are zero level(which mean no conversation)!
    Our students are completely captivated with the anticipation of tiny baby owls….
    We would so love and appreciate an informational visit from you, Mr. Cunningham. We, so, look forward to your updates on the GHO…Thank you so much, from Gould’s 4th grade class, for making an Owl baby’s birth an experience to learn for us!

    • Rick Cunningham says:

      Ms. Perry – thanks for contacting us. We’ve just set up this attempt to coordinate our educational activities and we glad to include your class in our activities once we figure out what and who. We’ll be in touch soon!

      Rick

  3. Joann Holcombe says:

    I am a PreK teacher in a public school in Newton County, Georgia. My students are 4 and 5 year olds. We watched the owls last year, and have been avidly watching them this year. We can’t go a day without someone wanting to “check” on the owls. Thank you so much for this site!

    • Rick Cunningham says:

      Joann – thanks for leaving contact info – we’re getting together on Tuesday Feb 2 to try to get an education coordinator volunteer. We’ll be in touch soon!

      Rick

  4. Colby says:

    Hi! I teach 5th grade at Parsons Elementary in Gwinnett County, and my students loved watching and learning about the owls last year. I’m excited to share the owls with my class again this year!

    • Rick Cunningham says:

      Colby – thanks for leaving contact info – we’re getting together on Tuesday Feb 2 to try to get an education coordinator volunteer. We’ll be in touch soon!

      Rick

      PS Is your full name Colby Bross?

  5. My classes watch the owl cam often! We are using it to have an owlet countdown in Pre K, to compare their anatomy to ours in K, compare animal communication in first and to teach acquired vs genetic traits in second. I am the science specialist for these grades and the owl cam is such a great teaching tool!

    • Rick Cunningham says:

      Carrie – thanks for leaving contact info – we’re getting together on Tuesday Feb 2 to try to get an education coordinator volunteer. We’ll be in touch soon!

      Rick

  6. Elizabeth Barrett says:

    Hi! I am a student teacher at ENOTA MI Academy in Gainesville Georgia. I’m interested to learn more about things I can do in my classroom revolving around the The Landings Owls! Please let me know any suggestions you may have.

    • Rick Cunningham says:

      Elizabeth – thanks for leaving contact info – we’re getting together on Tuesday Feb 2 to try to get an education coordinator volunteer. We’ll be in touch soon!

      Rick

  7. Cindy Drew says:

    4th grade class at Hancock Day School, 6600 Howard Foss Drive, Savannah, GA 31406

    • Rick Cunningham says:

      Cindy – thanks for leaving contact info – we’re getting together on Tuesday Feb 2 to try to get an education coordinator volunteer. We’ll be in touch soon!

      Rick

  8. Mrs. Hill's Block I says:

    Good Morning!

    We are currently working on a Great Horned Owl project and have been observing the nest throughout the school year. Our project consists of the following topics: Orgin/Culture, Appearance, Nourishment, Habits/Lifestyles, and Habitat. We were thrilled when the GHO decided to make her home in the nest. We are comprising some questions for our project and look forward to submitting them to you.

    Thank you,
    Mrs. Hill’s Block I

    P.S. Her class from last year participated as well.

    • Rick Cunningham says:

      Mrs. Hill – Glad to see that you and your class are back – thanks for leaving contact info – we’re getting together on Tuesday Feb 2 to try to get an education coordinator volunteer. We’ll be in touch soon!

      Rick

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